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Brian W. Haas

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Associate Professor
Behavioral and Brain Sciences Program

Education

Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2006

Research Interests

Our work seeks to understand what shapes people's identity. Our research investigates how people think about their identity, changes to their identity, and how identity is different according cultural contexts. We use a personality approach to understanding individual differences in identity. The overarching goal of our research is to illuminate what makes people who they are as dynamic complex individuals living across the world.

Dr. Haas will be considering new graduate students to investigate topics related to culture, personality and well-being for Fall 2022.

 

Google Scholar

Teaching Interests

I teach classes on Introductory Psychology, Cultural Psychology, Biological Basis of Personality, Social and Cognitive Neuroscience. I enjoy teaching new psychology classes, coming up with and applying innovative teaching methods, and learning along-side with students, as they bring in their thoughts and perspectives into the teaching environment. I am actively engaged in study abroad and international education, having taught on several UGA Study Abroad programs and as Fulbright Teaching Scholar to the Kingdom of Bhutan at Sherubtse College.

Media Coverage

British Psychological Society article based on: Haas & Omura, Cultural Differences in Susceptibility to the End of History Illusion. Personality and Social Psychological Bulletin

Uconn Today article based on: Haas et al., The role of culture on the link between worldviews on nature and psychological health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Personality and Individual Differences

UGA Today article written based on: Haas & vanDellen (2020). Culture Is Associated With the Experience of Long-Term Self-Concept Changes. Social Psychological and Personality Science

LA Times article written based on Haas et al., (2016). Epigenetic modification of OXT and human sociability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A.

UGA Today article written based on Haas et al., (2016). Epigenetic modification of OXT and human sociability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A.

UGA Today article written based on Haas et al., (2015). Borderline personality traits and brain activity during emotional perspective taking. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment.

Medical Research (MedicalResearch.com) interview based on Haas et al., (2015). Borderline personality traits and brain activity during emotional perspective taking. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment.

UGA Red and Black article written based on Haas et al., (2015). The tendency to trust is reflected in human brain structure. NeuroImage.

UGA Today article written based on Haas et al., (2015). The tendency to trust is reflected in human brain structure. NeuroImage.

Selected Publications

Haas, B.W., & Omura, K. (In Press). Cultural differences in susceptibility to the End of History Illusion. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. [PSPB

Krys, K., Capaldi, C.A., Torres, C., van Tilburg, W., Vignoles, V., Bond, M.H., Zelenski, J., Haas, B.W., , . . . Xing, C. (In Press). Societal emotional environments and cross-cultural differences in life satisfaction: A forty-nine country study. The Journal of Positive Psychology. [JoPP]

Cochran, R. N., VanDellen, M. R., & Haas, B.W., (2021). How did I get here? Individual differences in perceived retrospective personality change. Journal of Research in Personality, 90, 104039. [JRP]

Haas, B.W., Hoeft, F., & Omura, K. (2021). The role of culture on the link between worldviews on nature and psychological health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Personality and Individual Differences, 170, 110336. [PAID]

Haas, B.W., vanDellen M.R., (2020). Culture is Associated with the Experience of Long-term Self-concept Changes. Social Psychological and Personality Science. [SPPS]

Krys, K., Zelenski, J., Capaldi, C.A., Park, J., van Tilburg, W., van Osch, Y., Haas, B.W., . . . Zhu, Z. (2019). Putting the ‘We’ in Well-being: Collectivism-fit Measurement of Well-being Attenuates the Individualism-Well-being Association. Asian Journal of Social Psychology.22(3), 256-267. [AJSP]

Haas, B.W. (2019). Enhancing the Intercultural Competence of College Students: A Consideration of Applied Teaching Techniques. International Journal of Multicultural Education. 21 (2), 81-96. [IJME]

Cochran, R.N., vanDellen M.R., Haas, B.W. (2019). Getting to Know You: Associations between Judge and Target Personality with Personality Judgment Accuracy during a Dyadic Social Interaction Task.142, 139-144. [Personality and Individual Differences].

Haas, B.W., Akamatsu, Y. (2019). Psychometric Investigation of the Five Facets of Mindfulness and Well-Being Measures in the Kingdom of Bhutan and the United States. [Mindfulness].

Haas, B.W. (2018). The impact of study abroad on improved cultural awareness: a quantitative review. Intercultural Education, 1-18. [Intercultural Education]

Haas, B.W., Filkowski, M.M., Cochran, R.N., Denison, L., Ishak, A., Nishitani, S., Smith, A.K. (2016). Epigenetic modification of OXT and human sociability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A. PNAS

Filkowski, M.M., Anderson, I.W., Haas, B.W. (2016). Trying to trust: brain activity during interpersonal social attitude change. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience. 16 (2), 325-338. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Miller, J.D. (2015). Borderline personality traits and brain activity during emotional perspective taking. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. 6(4): 315-320. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Brook, M., Remillard, L., Ishak, A., Anderson, I.W., Filkowski, M.M. (2015). I know how you feel: The warm-altruistic personality profile and the empathic brain. PLoS ONE. 10(3): e0120639. [PloS One]

Haas, B.W., Anderson, I.W., Filkowski, M.M. (2015). Interpersonal reactivity and the attribution of emotional reactions. Emotion. 15(3): 390-398. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Ishak, A., Anderson, I.W., Filkowski, M.M. (2015). Agreeableness and brain activity during emotion attribution decisions. Journal of Research in Personality.57: 26-31. [JRP]

Haas, B.W., Ishak, A., Anderson, I.W., Filkowski, M.M. (2015). The tendency to trust is reflected in human brain structure. NeuroImage. 107: 175-181. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., & Smith, A. K. (2015) Oxytocin, vasopressin, and Williams syndrome: epigenetic effects on abnormal social behavior. Frontiers in Genetics. 6:28. [Frontiers]

Hoeft, F., Dai, L. Haas, B.W., Sheau, K.E., Masara, M., Mills, D., Galaburda, A., Bellugi, U., Korenberg, J., Reiss, A.L., (2014). Mapping Genetically Controlled Neural Circuitries of Social Behavior and Visuo-Motor Integration by a Preliminary examination of Atypical Deletions with Williams Syndrome. PLoS One. 9 (8), e104088. [PloS One]

Haas, B.W., Barnea-Goraly, N., Sheau, K.E., Yamagata, B., Ullas, U., Reiss, A.L. (2014). Altered microstructure within social-cognitive brain networks during childhood in Williams syndrome. Cerebral Cortex. Oct 24(10):2796-806. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Sheau, K. E., Kelly, R. G., Thompson, P., Reiss. A.L. (2014). Regionally specific increased volume of the amygdala in Williams syndrome: Evidence from surface based modeling. Human Brain Mapping. Mar;35(3):866-74.[PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Anderson, I.W., Smith, J.M. (2013). Navigating the complex path between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and cooperation: an endophenotype approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Nov 28;7:801. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Mills, D., Yam, A., Hoeft, F., Bellugi, U., Reiss, A.L., (2009). Genetic influences on sociability: Heightened amygdala reactivity and event-related responses to positive social stimuli in Williams syndrome. Journal of Neuroscience. 29(4):1132-9. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Constable, R.T., & Canli, T. (2008). Stop the sadness: Neuroticism is associated with sustained Medial Prefrontal Cortex response to emotional facial expressions. NeuroImage 42(1):385-92. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., & Canli, T. (2008). Emotional Memory function, Personality structure and Psychopathology: A Neural System Approach to the identification of vulnerability markers. Brain Research Reviews 58(1):71-84. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Omura, K., Constable, R.T., & Canli, T. (2007). Emotional conflict and neuroticism: personality-dependent activation in the amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate. Behavioral Neuroscience, 121(2), 249-256. [PubMed]

Haas, B. W., Omura, K., Constable, R. T., & Canli, T. (2007). Is automatic emotion regulation associated with agreeableness? A perspective using a social neuroscience approach. Psychological Science 18(2), 130-132. [PubMed]

Canli, T., Qiu, M., Omura, K., Congdon, E., Haas, B.W., Amin, Z., et al. (2006). Neural correlates of epigenesis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A 103(43), 16033-16038. [PubMed]

Haas, B.W., Omura, K., Constable, R. T., Canli, T. (2006). Interference Produced by Emotional Conflict Associated with Anterior Cingulate Activation. Cognitive, Affective Behavioral Neuroscience 6(2), 152-156. [PubMed]

Canli, T., Omura, K., Haas, B.W., Fallgatter A., Constable, R. T., Lesch K.P. (2005). Beyond Affect: A role for genetic variation of the serotonin transporter in neural activation during a cognitive attention task. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A (103)34, 12224-12229. [PubMed]

Klapp, S.T., & Haas, B.W. (2005). Nonconscious Influence of Masked Stimuli on Response Selection Is Limited to Concrete Stimulus-Response Associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 31(1), 193-209. [PubMed]

Articles Featuring Brian W. Haas
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 4:34pm

The Department of Psychology's Dr. Brian Haas and Dr. Michelle vanDellen new study was recently featured in UGA Today. Their study compared individual self-concepts between Americans and Japanese individuals and uncovered an essential contradiction about the…

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